New Patient Videos

Learning About Braces

Parts of Braces

Braces have several different components, and this video will introduce you to those parts – the brackets, archwires, and color ties.

Getting Braces

We will go through several different steps in order to place your braces on your teeth. The first step is cleaning the teeth – it is important that your teeth be free of plaque and food debris before we place your braces. Otherwise, the braces will not bond to your teeth properly. The second step is etching the teeth – this prepares the surface of your teeth to receive the bonding resin. The third step is applying the bonding resin – this will help the orthodontic cement to adhere to your teeth. The fourth step is placing the orthodontic cement on the back of the bracket and applying the bracket to the tooth. The fifth and final step is curing the orthodontic cement with a special light that will harden it. After the cement hardens, the bracket will adhere to your tooth.

Clear Ceramic Braces

This video demonstrates the difference in visual appearance between traditional metal braces and clear ceramic braces. Although they are not completely invisible, there is a significant difference in the appearance and noticeability of the ceramic braces.

Invisalign®

Invisalign® uses a series of clear trays to gradually move your teeth in very small increments. This treatment can include 5 to 30 sets of trays or more, each set of trays is typically worn for two weeks before moving on to the next set. The Invisalign® trays must be worn 22-23 hours per day to be effective.

Upper and Lower Partial Braces

Upper and lower partial braces have a wide range of applications including correcting anterior crossbites, creating space for erupting teeth, and correcting teeth that are out of position.

Separators

Separators are small rubber rings that fit in between the teeth. These are used as a part of orthodontic treatment to create space for metal bands that fit around the teeth. These bands are usually part of an appliance.

Bite Turbos

Bite turbos are small bite props that fit on the insides of the front teeth or on the tops of the back teeth. The purpose of these is to prevent you from biting on the brackets (braces) and breaking them off before your teeth can be moved into their proper positions. These are very often used for those who have deep bites – when the top teeth cover the bottom teeth more than is ideal.

Poking Wire

As your teeth shift while wearing braces, the wire may begin to protrude out of the back and poke your cheek. If this happens, give your orthodontist a call so that it can be fixed for you.

Wax Placement

Sometimes a wire or part of your braces may irritate your lip or cheek. This video demonstrates how wax is applied to your braces. The wax will provide temporary relief until you can be seen by your orthodontist.

Foods to Avoid

It’s important to avoid certain foods when wearing braces so that you don’t break one of your brackets or bend your wires. There are several steps to replace a bracket if one or more are broken, taking more time at your orthodontic visit and increasing the time that you will have braces.

Brushing with Braces

As important as it is to take care of your teeth with proper brushing when you don’t have braces, it’s even more crucial when you do have braces. This is because food and plaque easily accumulate around the braces, leading to permanent decalcifications (white marks) and cavities if you do not brush properly. This video properly demonstrates how to brush your teeth when you have braces.

Orthodonitc Flosser

Without a doubt, it is more difficult to floss while wearing braces than it is if you do not have braces. Thankfully, this orthodontic flosser makes flossing with braces much easier.

Proxabrush®

A Proxabrush®, or interdental brush, is used to clean under the wire in between two brackets. It is useful for cleaning out plaque and food that your toothbrush has a difficult time reaching.

Waterpik®

At Waterpik® is a special tool that can making cleaning between and around your braces much easier. It is not a substitute for brushing and flossing, but it does help clean extra debris and plaque before brushing and flossing, allowing you to do a better and more thorough job of cleaning around your braces.

Sports Mouthguard

Whether or not you have braces, it is important to wear a mouthguard while playing sports. These have several benefits, but the most important one is to protect your teeth from a painful and expensive injury. Sometimes it will also prevent your braces from being damaged or broken.

Crowding and Spacing

Fixing Front Teeth

Using braces, this video shows correction of a bite that does not fit together properly in the front.

Mild Crowding

This video shows how braces can fix mild crowding of the front teeth without needing to correct the bite in the back.

Severe Crowding

Sometimes there is not enough room for all of the teeth to fit in the mouth. This video demonstrates how removing four first premolars can create the needed space for teeth to properly fit together.

Closing Spaces

The most common way to close space with braces is by using elastic chain, also called powerchain. The powerchain fits over each individual bracket and applies tension to gently bring the teeth together.

Fixing Dark Triangles

Dark triangles are spaces in between teeth near the gums that can be corrected with a procedure called interproximal reduction as a part of braces.

Interproximal Reduction

This video shows how interproximal reduction works and that it is safe for your teeth. It only involves the enamel of a tooth and does not affect the second layer (dentin) or the nerve (pulp) of a tooth.

Different Types of Bites

Normal Bite

This video explains the characteristics that are typically seen in a normal bite after orthodontic treatment with braces or Invisalign® is complete.

Class II End-on Bite

In a Class II End-on Bite, all of the top teeth are positioned forward in relation to the bottom teeth. This is typically fixed with a combination of wearing braces and by properly wearing Class II Elastics as prescribed.

Class II Division 1 Bite

In a Class II Division 1 Bite, all of the top teeth are positioned significantly forward in relation to the bottom teeth. The upper front teeth are also flared forward, resulting in increased overjet. This is typically fixed with a combination of wearing braces and by properly wearing Class II Elastics as prescribed.

Class II Division 2 Bite

In a Class II Division 2 Bite, all of the top teeth are positioned significantly forward in relation to the bottom teeth. The upper front teeth are leaning backward, resulting in less overjet than in a Class II Division 1 Bite. This is typically fixed with a combination of wearing braces and by properly wearing Class II Elastics as prescribed.

Class II Bite Cause 1

This video shows how a larger (thicker) upper jaw bone can result in a Class II bite by causing the lower jaw to rotate down and backwards.

Class II Bite Cause 2

This video shows how a larger (longer) upper jaw bone can result in a Class II bite by causing all of the teeth in the upper jaw to be positioned further forward than those of the lower jaw.

Class III Bite

In a Class III Bite, all of the bottom teeth are positioned forward in relation to the top teeth. This is typically fixed with a combination of wearing braces and by properly wearing Class III Elastics as prescribed.

Class III Bite Cause

This video shows how a smaller (thinner) upper jaw bone can result in a Class III bite by causing the lower jaw to rotate further up and forward.

Posterior Crossbite (Right Side)

In a posterior crossbite, the top and bottom teeth do not fit together properly because the top teeth are hitting on the inside of the bottom teeth. Often, this is due to the upper dental arch being too narrow relative to the lower dental arch. This video shows a crossbite on the right side.

Posterior Crossbite (Left Side)

In a posterior crossbite, the top and bottom teeth do not fit together properly because the top teeth are hitting on the inside of the bottom teeth. Often, this is due to the upper dental arch being too narrow relative to the lower dental arch. This video shows a crossbite on the left side.

Posterior Crossbite (Jaw Shift)

A posterior crossbite usually results in a jaw shift to one side. This crossbite is corrected by widening the upper dental arch with an expander, eliminating the jaw shift.

Anterior Crossbite (Jaw Shift)

In an anterior crossbite, the bottom teeth often first hit edge to edge with the top teeth before shifting forward. This often causes excessive wear of the edges of the front teeth and gum recession of one or more lower front teeth.

Deep Bite 1

In a deep bite, the top teeth overlap the bottom teeth too much. Sometimes this results in the bottom teeth biting partially on the roof of the mouth. Not only can this be painful, but it has the potential to harm the top teeth over time.

Deep Bite 2

The top teeth overlap the bottom teeth too much in a deep bite. This video shows the difference between a deep bite and a proper bite with correct overlap of the top and bottom teeth. Achieving a proper bite through braces will often lead to less tooth wear, less stress on the jaw joints (TMJ), and better overall appearance of the teeth.

Open Bite

Sometimes the top and bottom jaws fit together improperly, resulting in an open bite. This should be fixed with braces, and depending on the severity and type of open bite, surgical correction may be required.

Orthodontic Elastics (Rubber Bands)

Anterior Box Elastic

This video demonstrates how an anterior box elastic will help correct an open bite when worn properly with braces.

Triangle Elastics

This video demonstrates the use of triangle elastics with braces, and how they will make your teeth fit together if worn properly.

Class II Elastics

This video demonstrates the use of Class II elastics with braces, and how they will correct a Class II bite if worn properly.

Class II Box Elastics

This video demonstrates the use of Class II box elastics with braces, and how they will make your teeth fit together if worn properly.

Class III Elastics

This video demonstrates the use of Class III elastics with braces, and how they will correct a Class III bite if worn properly.

Class III Box Elastics

This video demonstrates the use of Class III box elastics with braces, and how they will make your teeth fit together if worn properly.

Crossbite Elastic

This video demonstrates how a crossbite elastic will help correct a crossbite when worn properly with braces.

Anterior Box Elastic

This video demonstrates how an anterior box elastic will help correct an open bite when worn properly with braces.

Midline Correction Elastic

This video demonstrates how midline correction elastic with help correct a midline discrepancy when worn properly with braces.

Non-compliance with Elastics

In this video, we see that not wearing elastics properly with braces (or only wearing them sometimes instead of as prescribed by your orthodontist) will prevent you from making progress in correcting your bite and finishing your orthodontic treatment on time.

Orthodontic Appliances

2-Banded Expander

The purpose of a 2-banded expander is to widen the upper jaw so that the upper and lower jaws fit together properly or to create extra space needed for crowded teeth. Often, a 2-banded expander will help correct a posterior crossbite.

4-Banded Expander

The purpose of a 4-banded expander is to widen the upper jaw so that the upper and lower jaws fit together properly or to create extra space needed for crowded teeth. Often, a 4-banded expander will help correct a posterior crossbite.

Herbst Appliance

A Herbst Appliance promotes growth of a growing patient’s lower jaw so that it fits better with the upper jaw (corrects a Class II bite). This appliance is not removable and will stay in the patient’s mouth until it is removed by the orthodontist.

Traditional Headgear

Traditional headgear is used to restrict growth of the upper jaw and correct a Class II bite. The restriction of this growth typically reduces the amount the top teeth stick out in front of the bottom teeth and helps the teeth to fit together better before a patient gets braces.

Reverse Pull Headgear

A reverse pull headgear is used to promote growth of the upper jaw and correct a Class III bite. This extra growth typically results in the correction of any anterior crossbite, helps the top and bottom teeth to fit together better before a patient gets braces. It can also prevent the need for jaw surgery in the future.

Reverse Curve (Upper Arch)

Often, a deep bite can be corrected with braces by placing a curve in the wire that counteracts (or reverses) the curvature in the upper teeth.

Bite Plate

A bite plate would be used for a patient who has a deep bite. Its purpose is to protect the bottom teeth from biting on the roof of the mouth as well as create space between the back teeth, allowing them to further erupt, correcting the deep bite.

Distal Jet

This appliance can be used to correct a patient’s bite or to create extra room for teeth to erupt by pushing the upper teeth backwards.

Upper Space Maintainer

An upper space maintainer is useful when baby teeth are lost early because it prevents the back teeth from shifting forward into the space needed for future permanent teeth. If not prevented, this shifting of teeth can create extra crowding or even completely block out other teeth from erupting.

Lower Space Maintainer

A lower space maintainer is useful when baby teeth are lost early because it prevents the back teeth from shifting forward into the space needed for future permanent teeth. If not prevented, this shifting of teeth can create extra crowding or even completely block out other teeth from erupting.

Impacted Teeth

Impacted Canine

This video demonstrates the difference between the normal eruption of a canine (eye tooth) and the path a canine will take to become impacted. If a canine becomes impacted, braces are usually part of the solution.

Fixing an Impacted Canine

This video demonstrates how an impacted canine (eye tooth) can be corrected and brought into the dental arch using braces.

Impacted Molar

This video shows the eruption path a 6 year molar will take to become stuck underneath another tooth. Braces can be used to fix this, but sometimes it can also be fixed through other means.

Shifted Midline

This video shows how an upper midline can shift and not match with the lower midline due to an impacted canine (eye tooth). This should be fixed using braces.

Exposure of Canine

This demonstrates the laser exposure of a canine (eye tooth) and how it can subsequently be brought into position by braces.

Primary Canine Extraction

If by using an x-ray, your orthodontist can see that a permanent canine is not erupting properly, it is often recommended that the primary (baby) tooth be extracted. This will create a path of erupting for the permanent canine and will encourage it to correct its course.

Orthodontic Appliances

2-Banded Expander

The purpose of a 2-banded expander is to widen the upper jaw so that the upper and lower jaws fit together properly or to create extra space needed for crowded teeth. Often, a 2-banded expander will help correct a posterior crossbite.

4-Banded Expander

The purpose of a 4-banded expander is to widen the upper jaw so that the upper and lower jaws fit together properly or to create extra space needed for crowded teeth. Often, a 4-banded expander will help correct a posterior crossbite.

Herbst Appliance

A Herbst Appliance promotes growth of a growing patient’s lower jaw so that it fits better with the upper jaw (corrects a Class II bite). This appliance is not removable and will stay in the patient’s mouth until it is removed by the orthodontist.

Traditional Headgear

Traditional headgear is used to restrict growth of the upper jaw and correct a Class II bite. The restriction of this growth typically reduces the amount the top teeth stick out in front of the bottom teeth and helps the teeth to fit together better before a patient gets braces.

Reverse Pull Headgear

A reverse pull headgear is used to promote growth of the upper jaw and correct a Class III bite. This extra growth typically results in the correction of any anterior crossbite, helps the top and bottom teeth to fit together better before a patient gets braces. It can also prevent the need for jaw surgery in the future.

Reverse Curve (Upper Arch)

Often, a deep bite can be corrected with braces by placing a curve in the wire that counteracts (or reverses) the curvature in the upper teeth.

Reverse Curve (Lower Arch)

Often, a deep bite can be corrected with braces by placing a curve in the wire that counteracts (or reverses) the curvature in the lower teeth.

Bite Plate

A bite plate would be used for a patient who has a deep bite. Its purpose is to protect the bottom teeth from biting on the roof of the mouth as well as create space between the back teeth, allowing them to further erupt, correcting the deep bite.

Distal Jet

This appliance can be used to correct a patient’s bite or to create extra room for teeth to erupt by pushing the upper teeth backwards.

Upper Space Maintainer

An upper space maintainer is useful when baby teeth are lost early because it prevents the back teeth from shifting forward into the space needed for future permanent teeth. If not prevented, this shifting of teeth can create extra crowding or even completely block out other teeth from erupting.

Lower Space Maintainer

A lower space maintainer is useful when baby teeth are lost early because it prevents the back teeth from shifting forward into the space needed for future permanent teeth. If not prevented, this shifting of teeth can create extra crowding or even completely block out other teeth from erupting.

Impacted Teeth

Impacted Canine

This video demonstrates the difference between the normal eruption of a canine (eye tooth) and the path a canine will take to become impacted. If a canine becomes impacted, braces are usually part of the solution.

Fixing an Impacted Canine

This video demonstrates how an impacted canine (eye tooth) can be corrected and brought into the dental arch using braces.

Impacted Molar

This video shows the eruption path a 6 year molar will take to become stuck underneath another tooth. Braces can be used to fix this, but sometimes it can also be fixed through other means.

Shifted Midline

This video shows how an upper midline can shift and not match with the lower midline due to an impacted canine (eye tooth). This should be fixed using braces.

Exposure of Canine

This demonstrates the laser exposure of a canine (eye tooth) and how it can subsequently be brought into position by braces.

Primary Canine Extraction

If by using an x-ray, your orthodontist can see that a permanent canine is not erupting properly, it is often recommended that the primary (baby) tooth be extracted. This will create a path of erupting for the permanent canine and will encourage it to correct its course.

Small or Missing Teeth

Peg Lateral Incisors

This video shows the difference in size between smaller lateral incisors (called peg laterals) and normal sized lateral incisors. Peg laterals result in extra spaces when all of the teeth are properly positioned by braces or Invisalign®.

Peg Lateral (Veneer)

This video shows the option of fixing space left by a peg lateral incisor after braces by placing a veneer over the smaller tooth to make it larger.

Peg Lateral (Composite Buildup)

This video shows the option of fixing space left by a peg lateral incisor after braces by building it up with composite tooth material.

Missing Lateral Incisors (Implants)

This video shows the option to replace missing lateral incisors with implants after orthodontic treatment is complete and the patient has finished growing.

Missing Lateral Incisors (Teeth on Wire)

This video shows the option to replace missing lateral incisors with fake teeth on the wire during orthodontic treatment. This is a good option until braces are removed and permanent implants or a temporary soluction is put in place. Growth should be complete before any dental implants are placed.

Missing Lateral Incisor (Bonded Bridge)

This video shows the option to replace a missing lateral incisor with a bonded bridge. This is a good temporary solution until the patient is old enough to have a dental implant. Growth should be complete before any dental implants are placed.

Missing Lateral Incisors (Teeth in Retainer)

This video shows the option to temporarily replace missing lateral incisors with fake teeth in the retainer. This is a good temporary solution until the patient is old enough to have a dental implant. Growth should be complete before any dental implants are placed.

Canine Substitution

Although not typically an ideal solution, this video shows the option of replacing a missing lateral incisor with a canine (eye tooth) as part of orthodontic treatment.

Harmful Habits

Tongue Thrust

A tongue thrust, or forward rest posture of the tongue, interferes with the natural erupting of the teeth and causes them not to fit together properly. This should be addressed using a tongue crib to keep the tongue from coming forward and negatively affecting the teeth. Depending on the success of the tongue crib and other factors, braces may or may not be needed in the future.

Tongue Crib

A tongue crib is used to prevent a tongue thrust or forward rest posture of the tongue. Preventing this habit will allow the teeth to further erupt and come together.

Thumb Habit Appliance

Thumb-sucking is a habit that causes problems with the way teeth fit together. A thumb habit appliance is used to assist in breaking this habit by making it impossible to create suction (where the feeling of satisfaction comes from).

Orthodontic Extractions

Extractions for Severe Crowding

Sometimes there is not enough room for all of the teeth to fit in the mouth. This video demonstrates how removing four first premolars can create the needed space for teeth to properly fit together.

Extractions for Protruding Teeth

This video demonstrates how removing four first premolars will allow the orthodontist to bring your front teeth back by closing the extraction spaces. This will correct the position of these teeth so that they do not stick out (protrude).

Fixing Class II Bite (Extractions)

This video demonstrates how removing four premolars will allow the orthodontist to correct a Class II Bite so that the teeth will fit together properly.

Fixing Class III Bite (Extractions)

This video demonstrates how removing four premolars will allow the orthodontist to correct a Class III Bite so that the teeth will fit together properly.

Upper Extractions Only

This video demonstrates the correction of a Class II bite by removing two upper first premolars.

Lower Extractions Only

This video demonstrates the correction of a Class III bite by removing two lower first premolars.

Lower Incisor Extraction

This video demonstrates the removal of a lower incisor during orthodontic treatment.

Serial Extractions

This video demonstrates the sequential removal of primary and permanent teeth before getting braces, also known as serial extractions. This treatment is appropriate to help resolve significant crowding and will often make future orthodontic treatment more simple and straightforward.

Primary Canine Extraction

If by using an x-ray, your orthodontist can see that a permanent canine is not erupting properly, it is often recommended that the primary (baby) tooth be extracted. This will create a path of erupting for the permanent canine and will encourage it to correct its course.

Retainers

Clear Retainer

Clear retainers are a great option to keep your teeth in place after having braces removed. They are the most esthetically pleasing option for retainers, and they will keep your teeth perfectly in place as long as you wear them properly. The downside to these retainers, however, is that they will not typically last as long as traditional Hawley retainers or bonded retainers. They will need to be replaced periodically, usually every 4-5 years.

Traditional Retainer

A traditional Hawley retainer is another good option to keep your teeth in place after having braces removed. If properly cared for, they are the most durable option for retainers, and they will keep your teeth in place as long as they are worn properly. The downside to these retainers, however, is that they are more visible than clear retainers or bonded retainers.

Bonded Retainer

A bonded retainer is cemented to the backs your teeth and is not removable. The advantage to this type of retainer is that you won’t need to remember to put it back in after taking it out, but the disadvantage is that hard foods have the potential to break it. A broken bonded retainer will allow teeth to shift if it is not quickly repaired.

Spring Aligner

Similar to a traditional Hawley retainer, a spring aligner is a type of retainer that can potentially make minor corrections in the position of the top or bottom front teeth. Most commonly, these retainers are made for patients who have not worn their original retainers enough to keep their teeth from shifting.

Retainer Care

After your braces are removed, it is important to take good care of your retainer so that it will last as long as possible before needing to be replaced. This video will give you instructions on how to do just that.

TMJ

TMJ Closed Lock

This video compares a Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) that is functioning normally to one that is experiencing a closed lock. In a closed lock, the disc in the joint prevents the patient from being able to open fully. This can be accompanied by pain or muscle soreness.

TMJ Clicking

This video compares a Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) that is functioning normally to one that is experiencing clicking. With TMJ clicking, the disc is popping back and forth in the joint, resulting in a clicking sound and sometimes pain.

Dual Bite

A dual bite means that your teeth do not fit together correctly when your jaw joint (temporomandibular joint) is in the proper position. This can lead to problems like muscle pain in your jaw or joint pain.

Surgical Orthodontics

Laser Gingivectomy

In this video, we see how a laser gingivectomy can improve the appearance of your teeth and smile after braces by removing excessive gum tissue.

Exposure of Canine

This demonstrates the laser exposure of a canine (eye tooth) and how it can subsequently be brought into position by braces.

Mandibular Setback 1

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a severe underbite in patients that have finished growing.

Mandibular Setback 2

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a severe underbite in patients that have finished growing.

Mandibular Advancement 1

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a severe overbite (excessive overjet) in patients that have finished growing.

Mandibular Advancement 2

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a severe overbite (excessive overjet) in patients that have finished growing.

Maxillary Impaction 1

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a gummy smile in patients that have finished growing.

Maxillary Impaction 2

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a gummy smile in patients that have finished growing.

Maxillary Advancement

This video demonstrates a surgical procedure that, in conjunction with braces, can correct a severe underbite in patients that have finished growing.

Maxillary Impaction + Mandibular Advancement

This video demonstrates two surgical procedures that, in conjunction with braces, can correct an open bite as well as a severe overbite (excessive overjet) in patients that have finished growing.

TAD for Over-Erupted Molar

This video shows how Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) can be used to fix an over-erupted molar.

TAD for Molar Protraction

This video shows how Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) can be used to bring teeth forward into a missing tooth’s space. This will eliminate the need for getting an implant following orthodontic treatment.

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Marshall Orthodontics
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551 Harrison Bridge Rd,
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Our 5-star-rated Simpsonville, SC, orthodontist, Dr. William Marshall offers the most advanced braces for children, braces for teens and braces for adults. These types of braces and orthodontics include metal braces, self-ligating braces, clear braces, Invisalign and Invisalign Teen.
Call 864.336.2965 today for your free consultation for braces at our conveniently located Simpsonville orthodontic office.
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